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What is CITRT

Page history last edited by Scott Miller 11 years, 9 months ago

The Church IT Roundtable (CITRT for short) is a fellowship of Church & Ministry IT professionals who gather nationally, regionally, and virtually. Don't let the name confuse you, as it is both the name of the un-organization and the name of the recurring events. 

 

Again, The Church IT Roundtable (CITRT) is an informal organization of Church (and ministry) IT people from churches all across the country, and potentially even internationally. Very much like NACBA, MinistryCOM, and other organizations that involve church administration and church technology, there has been a growing interest among Church IT people to find ways to connect with each other. So, we started getting together using an unconference type approach.

 

Goals of Church IT RoundTable

  • To create people networks of Church IT professionals (both Church staff, consultants and companies) to assist and support Church IT
  • To provide Best of Class Solutions for Church IT
  • To provide regular Church IT RoundTable discussions, both online twice a month and face-to-face meetings twice a year
  • To encourage and have fellowship with one another
  • To provide an online forum to express ideas, ask questions, work out solutions to current challenges, and document best of class solutions to Church IT
  • To provide assistance and best value at the lowest possible cost to the Church IT professional

 

Definition of a Roundtable

A roundtable is a peer-learning event where the participants are both teachers and learners. A roundtable is:

• Small enough to emphasize interactive learning

• Led by a facilitator and peer

• Includes participants who have an affinity with each other

• Does not include a strong agenda beyond sharing knowledge

 

Roundtable members are selectively invited with less than 25 per group. The participants set the agenda and interaction among participants takes precedent over presentation by “experts.” In fact, in one-way or another, most of the roundtable participants are already experts.

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